November 14, 2010

Dazbog

Dazbog was one of the major gods of Slavic mythology, most likely a solar deity and possibly a cultural hero. He is one of several authentic Slavic gods, mentioned by a number of medieval manuscripts, and one of the few Slavic gods for which evidence of worship can be found in all Slavic nations.
Dazbog was a god of the Sun, flame and rain. Dazbog was also considered to be a giver-god, because one of his names was Dajbog. The first part of the name is “daj” – a form of the verb to give, while the second part “bog” means god. But what did Dazbog actually give? It is possible that giving refers the Sun and sunlight which is essential for many natural processes. The Sun was also very important to the Slavs. It was the source of life and was always considered to be a positive force. The Sun gave life to the Earth, and the god who gave it was therefore Dajbog. Dazbog actually stands for the Sun disc.



To a family he was a protector of the house’s fireplace and its fire, man’s basic necessity for survival during the winter, and an indispensable help in performing everyday work. But flames could be cruel and turn against men, and take them to the underworld or destroy their property. Flames’ benevolence was crucial to survival, and many rituals were therefore related to them.
Dazbog was definitely the god of rain, too. The rain was important because harvests depended upon it. In times of drought many rain invoking rituals were performed.
Slavs thought of themselves as Dazbog’s grandchildren, or his lineal descendants. Due to a short lifespan, it was uncommon in those times that grandchildren should meet their grandfather.



Upon conversion to Christianity demonic characteristics were attributed to Dazbog. He became the most powerful of the demons and the main opponent of the Christian God. This was possibly due to his appearance of a lame one-eyed old man, dressed in dark bear skin, dwelling in the underworld quite often. We can however opt for the possibility that this was due to the power of Dazbog’s cult that was to be eliminated at all costs. Dazbog’s characteristics were later in Christianity transferred to St Sava, who was also presented in folk tales as a shepherd followed by a wolf. St Sava is also a giver in those tales.


63 comments:

  1. I am loving these slavic mythology stories

    ReplyDelete
  2. Never heard of this one (I blame the Persona series), very cool

    ReplyDelete
  3. dazbog sounds pretty killer...fire and rain - kind of like a yin/yang thing. if i were a god, control of fire and rain would pretty much be all that was needed :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. i heard of that guy.
    keep up the hard work :D

    ReplyDelete
  5. Dazbog sounds like a really great name for a band. or a candy bar.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I like this deity, and how it transferred to other things over time. I really wish more people knew about Slavic deities; they have the same ancient feel as egyptian gods, but the pantheon feels closer to Greek or Viking - even though it is clearly not either one.

    ReplyDelete
  7. so much religions and jet every single one of them is bullshit :D

    ReplyDelete
  8. very cool.. This is definitely a unique blog.

    it's just nice to read anything that someone is passionate about

    ReplyDelete
  9. Aww this one is by far my favorite. Any god of flames and fire is definitely up there in my book. Combustion is such a sweet reaction, there is no way a god could not be cool if he is know for creating fires.

    Such that they had to turn him into a demon for christianity :( but then again, demons are pretty sweet. :D

    ReplyDelete
  10. awesome.
    i always compare and say which one i'd rather be.

    ReplyDelete
  11. how do flame and rain go together

    ReplyDelete
  12. thats bad ass god of Sun, flame and rain damn.... Christians are getting worst then the Catholics in my book .oh wait that would never happen....

    ReplyDelete
  13. I found this one the most interesting

    ReplyDelete
  14. interesting, I'll check back tomorrow

    ReplyDelete
  15. I must not be in good standings with this god, as I can never get my fireplace lit.

    ReplyDelete
  16. can u give link to wikipedia?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Great post. waiting for more updates

    ReplyDelete
  18. I fucking love your mythologic tales <3

    ReplyDelete
  19. Cool story, bro!
    Following your blog

    ReplyDelete
  20. Just came across your blog and man this is really interesting. I love mythology of all sorts, so I will definitely be coming back. =D

    ReplyDelete
  21. great post! i like it!
    supportin& following!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Of every virtue gives renown to men! Following!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Always look forward to your posts. Keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Psst, hey, I humbly demand more old gods!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Interesting... I can't wait to get a bit smarter with some more updates, haha.

    ReplyDelete
  26. this story happened so much back then

    ReplyDelete
  27. hi, nice blog.

    followin and showing love :)

    visit my place :)

    ReplyDelete
  28. In Helicanus may you well descry Following!

    ReplyDelete